never gonna break.

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radtracks:

ain’t no mountain high enough // marvin gaye & tammi terrell

there ain’t no mountain high enough
ain’t no valley low enough
ain’t no river wide enough
to keep me from getting to you

(via hveaen)

(via nisser)

me: what are taxes and how do I pay them?
school system: worry not
school system: mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell

"

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

"

-

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday.

Saluden Muchachxs, saluden.

(via frijoliz) Thank you frijoliz for blogging my essay and evelynthedesigner for letting me know. And unending gracias for 17k notes! Muchos saludos a todos. (via whiterhinoray)

(via thoughts-in-the-conscious-mind)

kiss-me-lick-me-eat-me:

If someone ever sang this to me I would cry.

Song had me crying

(Source: lizsplaylist, via updateghost)

enstill:

FUUUUUCCCCKKKKK THIS SONG MAKES ME CRY I LOVE THIS SONG SO MUCH WHOEVER POSTED THIS I LOVE YOU LITERALLY TEARS ARE COMING INTO MY EYES

(Source: unchartedlust, via no-hope-lizz)

Straight haired person: Just comb it!
Curly haired person:

"We all love someone way too fucking much."

- (via str8ruthless)

(Source: hedonistpoet, via f0rgodssakedear)

(Source: tatianamaslnay, via hispanicgringa)

edwardspoonhands:

justthenewkid:

nuggetxnicole:

Kids React To: The sudden realization of their own mortality

even the baby’s a little shook up by the end

This small human has internalized the inexorable march of time far better than I have.

(Source: lolgifs.net, via eyever)

reqinamills:

do you ever think you’re special to someone but then you see this person acting the same with everyone else and you just kind of 

oh

alright

(Source: alisonhendrrix, via diarycrux)